Song of the Earth


The scent emerges first,
A pungent smell of earth,
Up from the ground,
Barren of sound.

Sunshine sparks the frenzy.
Every fiber of soil thrusting,
Quaking and shaking,
Nature in the making.

The Master’s symphony
A chaotic cacophony.
Intelligently designed,
Uniquely sublime.

The gift of renewal,
Wrapped tightly with
Eternal ribbons
Of Promise and Hope.

Never ending resilience,
Accompanied by
Dazzling brilliance.
A song that resounds perfectly
from year to year.

Song of the Earth,
Play on, play on.

There are certain seasons when you can almost see and hear Mother Nature hard at work creating new life. It’s comforting to know that there’s a force so strong that it’s moving the earth below our firmly planted feet. This poem refers to the motion of “moving, shaking, and quaking the earth,” and serves as a reminder that there’s a lot happening in our world that we cannot see. I am eternally thankful for this promise.

Song of the Earth was written as a reminder of the ultimate renewal of life. Not only does this relate to the work being done in nature, but to the emotional work that we, as humans, are engaged in. Growth is the same in nature as it is with life.

      

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2 thoughts on “Song of the Earth

  1. What a beautiful Song of Earth! I hope the Song can keep returning year after year, but considering the way we inhabitants carelessly treat and abuse the earth, I fear the song -and the earth- may slowly die. Would that your beautiful poem could be passed around the world, so folks could wake up and ensure the Master’s symphony will continue.

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